Tag Archives: DIY

Managing Weeds In your Yard While keeping the grass

Everyone wants a weed free yard. Understanding where to start and setting realistic expectations is going to save you the frustration though as managing weeds in a lawn is an ongoing battle.

1.) Hand pulling weeds is going to help whenever you have established mature weeds already.

2.) Using a spot treatment is going to help on any weeds that are less mature or that are really hard to hand pull

3.) Preventing weeds is going to save you time on step 1 and 2, so be sure to apply your pre-emergent weed control religiously and using a broad post-emergent early is going to be more effective against less mature weeds.

We talk about attacking weeds in a bunch of ongoing mini-battles a lot here at Lawn Serv. We personally like to try to spend 5-10 minutes before mowing the lawn to walk the area, pick up sticks, and pull any mature weeds. After the mow take another 5-10 minutes pulling any mature weeds you saw while mowing while walking around with the spot treatment spraying anything too hard to pull.

After a few weeks of repeating that process you will have made a lot of great progress!

Enjoy the lawn!

Lawn Serv Team

https://lawnserv.com/

How to fix bald spots in a lawn

Bald spots on a lawn are something every homeowner experiences at one point or another in their pursuit of the perfect lawn.  Typically these spots can be fixed with a few easy steps, some water, and a little patience.

Cause of Problem

Most important is to determine what caused the spot to develop in the first place.  Without determining the underlying issue there is the potential the spot could return regardless of how well of a repair was completed.  The following is a fairly extensive list of potential culprits, some of which may require a little detective work with a shovel.

Excessive foot traffic

Animal urine

Dull lawn mower blades

Scalping by cutting your grass too short

Chemical spills

Poor soil condition caused by thatched grass

Lack of fertilization

Buried rocks or other debris

Erosion from water runoff

Tree or shrub roots

Drought

Dormancy due to the type of grass planted

Grub infestation

Chinch bugs and other insects

Fungal disease

Once you’ve determined the underlying issue and corrected as necessary the area is now ready for  some prep work.

Prepare Soil

Just sprinkling seeds and hoping for the best is not recommended for best results.  If there is a thatch layer or any debris over the spot, remove it with an aggressive raking to expose the topsoil below.  Once the soil is exposed, loosen up the top inch or so and then spread evenly so the entire surface is level with the surrounding soil.  It the spot is lower than necessary, add some quality top soil to bring it up to the correct level. Keep in mind loosen soil will compact a bit over time, so if the area is up to a ½ higher than its surrounding, that is ok.  

Spread Seed

With the soil prepared properly it’s time to spread some grass seed.  Remember to choose a seed that is appropriate for your climate and sunlight exposure of the area you are repairing.  Typically spots are repaired when needed, but keep in mind, cool season grasses do best when planted in late summer to early fall, while warm season grasses perform best when the seed is sown in spring or early summer. Once seed is spread, lightly rake the area to work the seed into the soil, paying careful attention to keeping the seeds spread evenly.  

Cover

Covering the seed is not necessary, but can be beneficial for a few reasons.  A light cover of peat moss will help retain moisture until the grass is established, which is especially important when performing repairs during the more humid times of the season. Covering with a bit of compost or enriched soil will give the seeds a bit of a nutrient boost, but be careful not to bury the seeds to deep or there is a chance they will not germinate.  In the absence of covering with soil, peat, etc. it is a good idea to cover the area with some straw, which helps a bit with moisture retention, but more importantly keeps the newly strewn seed from becoming a hungry birds snack.

Water

Of course no how-to dealing with grass goes without mentioning watering.  Water the seeds in the early morning and evening until they germinate, but also check throughout the day to ensure the area never dries out.  When watering, water well, but not hard. A gentle spray, like raindrops, or even a mist, is necessary so the seeds do not get pushed around by an aggressive water stream.

Final Steps

Hold off on mowing until the grass blades are over 3 inches tall, and even after the first mowing,  let the area grow slightly longer than the rest of the lawn until the colors of the two match. There is no need to fertilize immediately, as experts tend to agree that starter fertilizers are not useful until after the grass is established. Within a few weeks the spot will barely be noticeable from the rest of your lawn, and within a month, the trouble area with be just a memory.